The main reason why my Oregonian friend and I flew to Western Australia was so that we could swim with the Whale Sharks - and what a perfect time of year to do so!

This filter feeding creature is the largest known fish in the ocean, and we snorkelled just a couple of metres away from it. During April each year, the Whale Sharks swim along the Coral Coast to feed off spawning coral.

Advertised as an “Experience of a Lifetime,” the $400 full-day excursion was well worth it. Included in that price was a DVD of these professional photos taken while on our trip...

This Ningaloo Reef of the Coral Coast is Australia’s largest and most accessible fringing reef. Here’s a view from the plane. Yes, it’s very flat and there’s not much shade.

The area is known for its biodiversity, and as such, we were even lucky enough to have a rare siting of a couple of dugongs.

From here on, I will share my own personal photos from our journey...

These towers, reaching heights taller than the Empire State Building, are some of the largest in the world. This Naval Communication Station at Ningaloo was the base for passing messages between Australia and the United States command centres, their ships, and their submarines during WWII.

Here’s a termite mound that had busted open, exposing the intricate housing system inside.

Without much in the way for local entertainment, the recent 100th Anniversary of the Vlaming Head Lighthouse was the talk of the town. If in Exmouth, this is where you head at night to have a good time.

During the day, you go here - to Tourquoise Bay...

Emu = the #1 culprit for Coral Coast traffic jams...

It doesn’t take much to attract the attention of birds in these parts of town...

More beach fun along the Ningaloo Coast...

After our Coral Coast adventure, we headed south

to Nambung National Park to visit The Pinnacles

The limestone of The Pinnacles came from a time of rich marine life in the area. Seashells were broken down into lime rich sands which blew inland and formed high sand dunes. Exactly how the sand dunes caused The Pinnacles to form is a subject of some controversy. The idea which I thought sounded best was that the dunes blew over and covered the forest - over time, erosion occurred revealing casts of tree trunks where The Pinnacles now stand. In other words, each Pinnacle used to be a tree.

Sand dunes still line the Indian Ocean beach front in this area.

I felt that the dunes looked like hills of snow.

Continuing south towards Perth, we visited

Yanchep National Park and spotted kangaroos...

...some koalas...

... and some galahs

We didn’t do much more than just drive through Perth...

...because we were more interested in the the funky beach town of Fremantle:

Across the road from the ferris wheel was the Little Creatures Brew Pub - where my friend and I endeared our holiday’s final hours.